The History Corner

Liars in Loughgall

Posted on: 2nd July, 2018 in The History Corner

The Troubles spanned three decades but the single greatest loss of life for the IRA came in a small village in Armagh called Loughgall on May 8, 1987. This loss of life became known as the Loughgall Ambush. It was...

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Hell in Headford

Posted on: 7th June, 2018 in The History Corner

“Ní neart go cur le chéile.” – “There is strength in unity.” – Irish Proverb The above saying translates as “There is strength in unity.” or as “A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.” In Headford, County...

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The eventful journey of ‘Revenge for Skibbereen’

Posted on: 8th May, 2018 in The History Corner

By Pauline Murphy The National Famine Commemoration takes place at University College Cork on May 12. An Gorta Mór was a catastrophic event in Irish history and it left physical and mental scars on Cork, most notably in the west...

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Fight or Flight

Posted on: 8th May, 2018 in The History Corner

An emotion is an instantaneous impulse or reaction to an event that has occurred. An emotion is our brain triggering pleasant or unpleasant physical responses to abstract stimulations. If the person that you love decides that the feeling is not...

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Fourteen Days

Posted on: 3rd April, 2018 in The History Corner

“The path to peace is never easy. They have chosen hope over hate, the promise of the future over the poison of the past.” – Bill Clinton on the Good Friday Agreement   The Troubles spanned four decades. Ireland was...

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The Irish Question

Posted on: 9th March, 2018 in The History Corner

“Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste, ná Béarla cliste.” – “Broken Irish is better than clever English.” The power of the Irish language is evident in that it is one of the main components in keeping the padlock on the doors of...

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The unknown nurse

Posted on: 6th February, 2018 in The History Corner

Stories of ‘ordinary’ men and women healing the participants of war and dealing with its aftermath are rarely noticed or remembered in history. In this regard, the memory of Easter 1916 is no different to any other war. The staff...

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How Blythe was ‘deported’ from West Cork

Posted on: 6th February, 2018 in The History Corner

It was a crisp Sunday morning in 1923 when, as mass ended at St John the Baptist church in Newcestown, a lorry of Free State troops pulled up outside the church gates and rounded up the first few men coming...

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