Clonakilty author Louise O’Neill nominated for prestigious literary prize

louise-oneill

Posted on: 6th December, 2016

Category: Arts & Entertainment

Contributor: West Cork People

Above: Louise O’Neill Pic: Clare Keogh

Seven Irish novels, including Clonakilty author Louise O’Neill’s ‘Asking for It’ are among 147 titles that have been nominated for the €100,000 International DUBLIN Literary Award, the world’s most valuable annual literary prize for a single work of fiction published in English.

The Irish titles nominated for 2017 are: The Blue Guitar by John Banville; Beatlebone by Kevin Barry; Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume; The Green Road byAnne Enright; The Little Red Chairs by Edna O’Brien; Miss Emily by Nuala O’Connor; Asking For It by Louise O’Neill.

The International DUBLIN Literary Award (formerly known as the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award) is managed by Dublin City Council’s library service. Margaret Hayes, Dublin City Librarian, announced that the 147 books eligible for the 2017 award were nominated by libraries in 109 cities and 40 countries worldwide; noting that 43 are titles in translation, spanning 19 languages and 30are first novels.

Speaking of the global interest in the Award, the City Librarian remarked “This great prize demonstrates Dublin’s international support for contemporary writers and gives tangible expression to Dublin as A City of Words, an active member of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network, a UNESCO City of Literature. It also brings readers together in an unparalleled international book club connected through their local public libraries”.

The 2017 Judging Panel comprises Chris Morash, Seamus Heaney Prof of Irish Writing and Vice Provost of Trinity College Dublin; Ellah Allfrey, OBE, critic, broadcaster and editor; Katy Derbyshire, translator, critic and essayist; Kapka Kassabova, poet, novelist and writer and Jaume Subirana, writer, critic and translator. The non-voting Chairperson is Eugene R. Sullivan.

Other novels nominated for the 2017 Award include The Sellout by Paul Beatty, winner of the 2016 Man Booker Prize; A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson, winner of the 2015 Costa Prize; The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen, winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, Hope Farm by Peggy Frew, Salt Creek by Lucy Treleor and The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood, finalists for the 2016 Miles Franklin Award.

Among the 43 translated books are novels originally published in Arabic, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Kannada, Macedonian, Montenegrin, Slovene and Turkish. Translated authors include Milan Kundera, Mia Couto and Isabel Allende. As in previous years, translated titles comprise almost one third of the longlist.

The book that received most nominations this year is Kate Atkinson’s A God in Ruins, chosen by nine libraries in Australia, Canada, England, Greece, New Zealand, Norway, Scotland and Spain.

The shortlist will be published on April 11, 2017 and the Lord Mayor of Dublin will announce the winner on June 21.

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